What is dangerous in ice climbing

Abstract

Ice climbing is seen as a dangerous sport with a high risk of injury. So far there has been no scientific data on injuries and their frequency in this sport. The aim of the study was to determine the risk of ice climbing injuries and to describe their type. 88 ice climbers from nine countries answered a complex questionnaire on ice climbing injuries, climbing experience and risk behavior. Ice climbing hours were recorded and injuries and overloads were classified according to the NACA score. To make a comparison with other sports, the risk of injury per 1,000 hours of exercise was calculated. 88 ice climbers reported 23,361 ice climbing hours over a period of three years. A total of 4.1 injuries per 1,000 hours (NACA 1-3) and of these 1.2 NACA 2-3 injuries per 1,000 hours were found. There were 0.8 overloads / 1,000 hours of exercise (NACA 1-2). In contrast to the general assessment, our study shows that ice climbing, although objectively dangerous, nonetheless has a low frequency of injuries. The results of the injury frequency per 1,000 hours of exercise were comparable to indoor climbing (3.1 / 1,000 hours) and other outdoor sports (Nordic walking, mountain biking, kayaking). Author's presentation

Abstract

Ice climbing is widely considered to be a hazardous sport with a high risk of injury. To date, there has been no scientific analysis to characterize and reveal the prevalence of injury in this sport. The purpose of this study was to quantify and rate ice climbing injuries. 88 ice climbers from nine countries completed a complex questionnaire on ice climbing accidents and injuries, climbing frequency and risk behavior. Ice climbing hours were quantified and injuries rated according to the NACA score. To enable comparison to other sports, injury risk was calculated per 1000 hours of participation in a given sport. The 88 ice climbers recorded 23361 ice climbing hours over a three-year period. Our calculations from this data found 4.1 injuries NACA 1-3 / 1000 hours, 1.2 injuries NACA 2-3 / 1000 hours. Overuse syndromes occurred in 0.8 / 1000 hours ice climbing. Contrary to the popular perception, our study demonstrated that ice climbing is not a sport with a high risk of injury. The results of injury risk per 1000 hours of participation in ice climbing was comparable to that of indoor competition climbing (3.1 / 1000 hours) and other outdoor sports (hiking, mountain biking, kayaking). Author's presentation