What is nothing according to Zen Buddhism

Wabi-Sabi - the zen of things. About Buddhism and beauty.

Footnotes

1L. Koren, Wabi-Sabi for Artists, Designers, Poets & Philosophers, 7.

2 See ibid. 16.

3 Cf. "わ び ・ さ び", in: Wikipedia.

4G. Parkes / A. Loughnane, Japanese Aesthetics.

5 cf. Koren, 32.

6 cf. Parkes / Loughnane, Japanese Aesthetics, chap. 3. Wabi: Simple, Austere Beauty.

7 Ibid.

8 See ibid.

9 See ibid.

10 Cf. ibid. Chap. 4. Sabi: Rustic patina.

11 Ibid.

12 See "Murata Jukō", in: Wikipedia.

13 See chap. 2.1 Meaning of the word.

14 See "Sen no Rikyū", in: Wikipedia.

15 cf. "Wabi-cha", in: Wikipedia.

16 cf. Koren, 33.

17 See ibid. 61.

18 Cf. ibid. 34–36.

19 See "Aesthetics", in: Wikipedia.

20 cf. Parkes / Loughnane, Japanese Aesthetics, chap. 1. Introduction.

21 Cf. わ び ・ さ び, in: Wikipedia.

22 For example, the tea ceremony (Chadō), the art of arranging flowers (Ikebana), the art of archery (Kyūdō) etc.

23Parkes / Loughnane, Japanese Aesthetics, chap. 1. Introduction.

24 cf. ibid.

25 cf. Parkes / Loughnane, Japanese Aesthetics.

26 cf. Koren, 7.

27 Cf. "Tanizaki Jun’ichirō", in: Wikipedia.

28 Cf. "In Praise of the Shade", in: Wikipedia.

29 cf. Parkes / Loughnane, Japanese Aesthetics, chap. 4. Sabi: Rustic patina.

30Koren, 21.

31 Ibid. 15th

32 The Japanese term Iemoto refers to the founder or current grandmaster or to a system of family generations in the traditional Japanese arts that has a hierarchical structure and keeps the traditions of the school secret.

33 cf. Koren, 15–18.

34 cf. T. Deshimaru, Questions to a Zen Master, 52.

35 cf. Gmainer-Pranzl, Franz, "... In more than just one cultural tradition ..." (F.M. Wimmer). On the project "Intercultural Philosophizing", 124–128.

36 Rham Adar Mall criticizes this as "rational absolutism". See also Gmainer-Pranzl 2018, footnote 26.

37Deshimaru, 51.

38E. Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery, 60.

39Koren, 16.

40 cf. Herrigel, 5.

41 Ibid. 24

42 Ibid. 6-7.

43 See "Mazu Daoyi", in: Wikipedia.

44 cf. Herrigel, 7.

45S.B. park, Buddhist Faith and Sudden Enlightenment, 79.

46 Ibid.

47Deshimaru, 87–88.

48 cf. H.-G. Möller, In the middle of the circle. Daoist Thought, 38–40.

49 See ibid. 202–203.

50 Ibid. 203.

51 cf. Deshimaru, 86.

52Möller, 34.

53 See ibid. 205.

54 Cf. ibid.

55 Ibid.

56 See ibid. 206.

57 Ibid. 36.

58 cf. Parkes / Loughnane, Japanese Aesthetics, chap. 6. Yūgen and Landscape Painting.

59 Ibid.

60Herrigel, 40.

61 Ibid. 59.

62 Ibid. 44.

63 Ibid. 49.

64 Ibid. 55.

65 See ibid. 57.

66 See "Madhyamaka", in: Wikipedia.

67 See chap. 2.2 Concept history

68Koren, 7.

69 Ibid.

70 cf. Deshimaru, 86.

71 cf. G.M. Nagao, The Foundational Standpoint of Madhyamika Philosophy, Jan.

72Koren, 7.

73 Ibid. 51.

74 Ibid.

75 cf. Deshimaru, 13.

76Nagao, 18.

77 Ibid. 19th

78 Ibid.

79 Ibid.

80 Ibid.

81 Ibid.

82 Ibid.

83 "Initially, a principle of government. As meant be Deshimaru Roshi, a paradoxical question of existence. Also, a principle of eternal truth transmitted by a master." Deshimaru, 142.