Why are they called necklaces?

Curb chain - where does the name come from?

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July 15, 2011 - 6:53 pm

 · #1
Since I'm among goldsmiths here, I have a question:

Why are tank tracks called what they are called?

While looking around on the jewelry portal, I found one or the other, e.g. goldsmith's exercise making curb chain and this thread, in which, among other things, it becomes clear what a curb chain looks like.

But I would like to know why they are called that. That might be a pretty naive question, but I would still appreciate answers.
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07/15/2011 - 7:44 pm

 · #2
The process of twisting each loop 90 degrees in this type of chain is called armoring
but why?
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07/15/2011 - 8:22 pm

 · #5
The same word, two different questions
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07/15/2011 - 8:26 pm

 · #6
Ok thats right Question from "why is that called armored chain" reduced to "why is that called armor". : mrgreen: is already a step forward.
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07/15/2011 - 8:44 pm

 · #7
I once activated my mom because I know that she has an etymological dictionary and I wanted to know where Tilo's word "armor" comes from.

armor comes from the armor. Panzer has its origin in the French word panse, which means body, belly, belly (this is where the rumen of a cow comes from). So. Then there is also the word pencer or pencier (I hope I'm spelling that right, French over the phone is hard to understand), which means to prepare for the body. These French words come from Latin, from the word pantex, which translates as the paunch. So much for the etymology.

Now my mom has looked in another encyclopedia under armor (academic household offers a lot) and came up with the armored shirt, which comes from a ring armor that consisted of rings riveted or braided into one another. Later the chain armor and harness developed from it.

Nuuuun I could think of the following:

The chain mail or chain mail consists of eyelets which, due to their special "weave", lie against the body and are not perpendicular to the body. MAYBE the curb chain is to be understood as a kind of relic of chain mail, that is, its shape / design is based on a chain of chain mail. And hence the name curb chain.

I think that sounds logical. And if someone can tell me where the hell I put my handicraft instructions for chainmail, then I could possibly upload my own picture to support my thesis * grumble *
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July 15, 2011 - 9:01 pm

 · #8
pretend you're really great, you think just as crazy as I do

Sounds conclusive.
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July 15, 2011 - 9:09 pm

 · #9
what's wrong with it? Since I have a new philologist as a mother and a pastor as a father and grew up in a household where umpteen different lexicons were available, I like to take a look at one of them - and then go for it. But this time my mother took care of the browsing for me. The chain mail was a voluntary recall from my mother, who wanted to share her latest knowledge with me
Tradition is preserving the fire and not worshiping the ashes (Uli Haass after Mahler)

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07/17/2011 - 4:06 pm

 · #10
So I'm thinking more of certain military vehicles because the armored chain, like their driving chains, also lies flat.
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07/18/2011 - 5:29 pm

 · #11
So if it were about the term "chain mail", then I would completely agree with Tatzes definition, precisely because of the beautiful conclusion.
But since it's about the curb chain, I would rather join Silberfrau.
The anchor chain comes from the chain that hangs on the anchor and not from the "chain anchor".
But who knows ?!
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River
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07/18/2011 - 6:03 pm

 · #13
how long have armored chains been around?
and how long have there been motorized tanks with driving chains?

exactlyuuuuuu
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07/18/2011 - 6:11 pm

 · #14
Quote written by Tilo
and how long have there been motorized tanks with driving chains?

far too long in my opinion
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07/18/2011 - 6:42 pm

 · #15
So I only know that the step of twisting the individual eyelets is called armoring.

And since the pattern has actually been around much longer than the tracked vehicle, the explanation that such a vehicle drove over an anchor chain and the pattern was created by chance does not help either: mrgreen:
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